Wheat and Gluten

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bread-rollsEven though white and whole wheat are often thought to be different from one another, a correct dietary regime must consider both types of flour and the bran as well.

An intolerance to wheat flour, white or whole as it may be, it’s not the same thing as celiac disease, or gluten allergy. Aside from gluten, wheat flour contains numerous other protein antigens. In fact, recent studies have shown that it also contains some carbohydrate antigens.

For this reason it’s possible to eat some products that are specifically formulated for celiac sufferers as long as they contain alternative flours and not wheat flour from which the gluten has been removed (deglutinated).

One must examine the ingredients labels very carefully because these products are often obtained from hydrogenated vegetable fats and contain various preservatives and coloring agents.

In addition, the fact remains that the leavening process is very difficult without gluten and therefore the quantity of leavening substances in these products is extremely great: at least twice as much as in normal baked goods. This leads to a massive consumption of yeasts that could possibly create intolerance to these types of foods.

In light of this, we suggest that you take great care and select homemade products or those which don’t always contain yeast, such as puffed cakes or extruded slices whenever possible.

List of foods containing wheat, to avoid on a rotational basis according to the instructions given:

  • Bread and baked goods: white and whole wheat bread, bread sticks, melba toast, cookies, sweets, cakes, croissants, pastries, pizza, tartlets. Bread made with other cereals, such as oats, corn or soy, are almost always mixed: a certain amount of wheat flour is generally added to make them soft. You must always be sure of what they’re really made of and, if in doubt, abstain from them. Even breads or baked products containing spelt, rye and kamut should be restricted because, even though they are genetically different, these cereals are so similar to wheat that they could interfere with the interruption of reactivity (and the symptoms).
  • Pasta: every type of pasta (including whole wheat and egg) whether homemade or industrially produced. Even in this case pasta made with spelt or kamut must be restricted.
  • Bran and mixed whole wheat preparations: where multi-cereal products are concerned, for example breakfast flakes and some snacks (even diet foods or supplements), you must be sure of their exact composition.
  • Assorted natural and macrobiotic products: semola, semolina, bulgur, cous cous are all wheat in various forms. Kokkoh flour, “Yannoh” cereal coffee substitute and seitan contain wheat as well.
  • Breading: whether in the form of bread crumbs or flour.
  • Creams and industrially prepared sauces: for example soy sauce and some types of mayonnaise, béchamel, desserts, puddings, gelatins; wheat flour can sometimes be found in industrially prepared ice creams as a “thickener”.
  • Beer, whiskey and some kinds of malt: during the first stage of the diet, all types of beer are to be avoided because contamination with wheat may occur during the production process. The same is true for whiskey: while wheat is obviously present in scotch, it may possibly be present in “single-malts” as well.
  • Cheese rinds or sot cheese coatings: such as Brie, Chamois, Camembert, etc.
  • Industrially prepared products containing semola wheat.
  • Products which contain substances described as “vegetable or cellulose thickeners”.

Weekly abstinence even for those who are not intolerant

Even if a specific reactivity has not been found, since wheat is one of the most common components in our daily diet, it’s a good idea to consider taking one day per week of abstinence in order to free the body of any possible overload. Due to the fact that the foods in our diet which contain wheat often contain yeast and salt as well, it might be sensible to take advantage of the wheat abstinence day to avoid the foods listed in the Salt and Yeast profiles, too.